College Swimming and Diving Drills

December 21, 2011
by Justin

Welcome back to The Deep End, the new college swimming and diving blog, written by the @HempsteadHuddle, and provided to you by ScoutMe.  The first week’s issue took and in-depth look at two programs across the college swimming and diving spectrum, Auburn and Drury University. The second week got into the meat and potatoes of high-level college swimming and diving, with some great workouts for each aspect of the sport. This week will be an expansion of volume two’s swimming and diving techniques and drills. Let’s check these drills out.

 

College Swimming and Diving Drill: Riding the Board

Last week the emphasis was riding the board, so naturally the next progression is the five-step approach. When you are springboard diving, the judges want to see you exuding gracefulness, which include deliberate long-body diving movements and your fingers pointed. The steps start small and get larger as you gather momentum into your initial diving motion. Your head should be level while springboard diving, only looking down with your eyes and never ducking your chin. Use your arms to generate momentum into your second jump, while maintaining the five-step diving pattern consistently. Here is what the diving drill looks like at its best.

 

College Swimming and Diving Workout #1

At the college swimming and diving level, you are going to go through some difficult practices. The best way to get into swimming shape is to swim. Here are four some great drills provided by the NTC Masters Swim Blog.

 

Double-Stop-Catch-up:

Pause your swimming stroke for a moment. Be sure both hands are forward when each hand reaches your thigh before exiting the water.

 

Finger-Tip Drag:

Start by swimming in regular freestyle form. When your arm is out of the water, be sure to keep your elbow pointed toward the sky and your fingertips pointing down toward the water. Allow your fingertips (about 1/2 inch) to drag through the water from your hips all the way past your head, while maintaining your proper swimming form.

 

Catch-Up:

Start by swimming in regular freestyle form. As you take a swimming stroke with your right arm, keep your left arm extended forward in the water. Complete the swimming stroke with your right arm and after it enters the water above your head, tap your left hand. This signals the start of the swimming stroke with your left arm. Keep your right arm extended forward in the water until the left swimming stroke is completed and hands tap together.

 

Catch-Up w/Board or Stick or Single Paddle:

Use a sideways kick-board or a stick to perform the drill above. Keep your hands shoulder-width apart and exchange the board or stick from hand-to-hand between each swimming stroke.

 

Shark Drill:

Use a pull buoy or a kick board between your thighs. After the finish of each swimming stroke, reach back and tap the part of the buoy that is above water. This swimming drill emphasizes finishing your stroke all the way to mid-thigh.

 

Sailboat Drill:

Hold a kick board between your thighs. Make sure 1/2 of the board is sticking below your body when you’re swimming freestyle. Use your core to control your hip rotation.

 

Shark Drill:

Use a pull buoy or a kick board between your thighs. After the finish of each swimming stroke, reach back and tap the part of the buoy that is above water. This drill emphasizes finishing your swimming stroke all the way to mid-thigh.

 

Fist Drill:

Start by swimming in regular freestyle form. Ball your hands into fists and work on high elbow catch and pull while executing the proper swimming stroke under the water.

 

6-kick-switch:

When you push off the wall, take one underwater pull with your right arm and pause (right arm against your side, left arm extended overhead) for 6 kicks. After six kicks, complete the swimming stroke with your right arm, tap your left hand, and repeat with your left arm.

 

 

It was my favorite cartoon fish Dory, who once said one of my favorite quote in reference to her approach with life: “Just keep swimming.” No matter your level or what your P.R. is, you still have time to make this your best swimming and diving season left. Until the next time, this is The Deep End, bringing you are the best in college swimming and diving, and this is Yorick Hempstead signing off.

 

 

Yorick Hempstead is an ex-college athlete who is a sports blogger for ScoutMe. He is always talking sports on twitter @HempsteadHuddle.

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